broadsideblog

Breathtaking beauty in NYC, ends March 30: Fortuny, go!

In antiques, beauty, culture, design, Style on March 10, 2013 at 12:13 am

Have you ever heard of Mariano Fortuny y Madrazo?

Robe de Mariano Fortuny. L'influence des arts ...

Robe de Mariano Fortuny. L’influence des arts de l’Islam (musée des arts décoratifs, Paris) (Photo credit: dalbera)

Likely not.

But oh, his talent! His designs — for lighting, color, textiles and paint — are still innovative, timeless and stunning decades after their creation; he lived from 1871 to 1949. If you are anywhere near New York City before March 30, get to 684 Park Avenue, $15 admission, and savor some of the loveliest clothes you will ever see in your life!

If you’ve been watching (?) the hit television series Downton Abbey, you might have caught a scene with Isabel Crawley wearing a very Fortuny-esque black silver-printed sheath. Fortuny’s timeless designs are a perfect period fit for a quirky, rich, bohemian Edwardian like her.

Fortuny Lamps, Venice, Italy

Fortuny Lamps, Venice, Italy (Photo credit: Andy Ciordia)

He certainly began his artistic life with some major advantages — his father and grandfather were directors of the Prado, the exquisite museum in Madrid. Coming from a wealthy background allowed him the time and means to travel widely and to find and cultivate rich women eager to wear and collect his gowns.

His images and references are from Africa, Morocco, the Middle East and earlier historic periods. His shimmering, softly draped fabrics look embroidered with gold or silver threads — but it is metallic paint pressed into silk velvet or cotton or linen with a carved block.

His secret for tightly pleating silk has often been mimicked, but never exactly duplicated. The hem of his Delphos dresses, simple columns of pleated silk, spill out onto the floor like the open petals of a flower. His attention to detail is exquisite: tiny Venetian beads edge his sleeves, satin cord lines his necklines and he included a pleated silk inset on the inside of a sleeve.

The clothes were considered too daring — uncorseted! — for daytime, outdoor use, but women who began wearing them in public were making the case for being beautiful and comfortable at the same time.

I first saw his work at a museum in Lyons, when I was 23 and traveling Europe alone for four months, and I still treasure a poster I bought there then. On that same trip, I went to Venice to Palazzo Orfei, his studio, whose windows are made of round circles of glass, like the bases of wine bottles. The space is filled with his textiles and in the corner is a small white porcelain sink, its edge stained — decades later — with the dried paint he casually smeared off his brushes. It felt like he’d just gone out for a coffee and might return soon.

Palazzo Orfei

Palazzo Orfei (Photo credit: TracyElaine)

I went to this show in Manhattan with a friend, a woman who is very slim and tall and elegant and who I knew would also appreciate his work. It felt like introducing her to some of my old and dearly beloved friends. What a delight to see them again!

As we were leaving the show, I began wrapping my throat in a cream-colored pleated silk scarf/muffler I bought at Banana Republic about 15 years ago — and realized, with a grateful smile, that I’ve been wearing a simulacrum of Fortuny all these years.

English: Mariano Fortuny y Madrazo

English: Mariano Fortuny y Madrazo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

  1. Thanks for the tip! I’ve got Spring Break at the end of the month and I was hoping to spend a day in NY. I’ve added this show to my list. Maybe we’ll even be able to meet up for that cup of coffee we talked about?

  2. His style is timeless, isn’t it. I could wear it today and no one would bat an eye. If I had the figure to get away with wearing such styles, I would… but I’ll have to settle for soft scarves draped around my neck.

  3. Coming to nyc for work in a few weeks! Will have to check it out! Thanks for the recommendation!

  4. I am actually thankful to the holder of this site who has shared this great article at here.

  5. So, it’s obvious you MUST check it out the Museo del Traje (Madrid) webpage: http://museodeltraje.mcu.es/

    Like 2 years ago they dedicated a whole expo to Fortuny’s designs… and everytime I go there, there’s always a nice exhibition: if you ever pass by Madrid, this is your hidden place to go.

    It amazes me even spaniards don’t know about this place!! :-S

    • Gracias! This exhibit made many mentions of that museum and I’d love to see it. I was in Madrid many years ago and saw the Prado, of course. It’s on my list now.

  6. I love Fortuny! He and Poiret were game-changers back in the early 20th Century certainly. I’m definitely going to put this on my calendar and get myself to that exhibit. I want to see those clothes in person…

  7. Good to know you’re still here — and in NY. I hope (?) work is going well.

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