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Posts Tagged ‘shelter magazines’

Twelve Things I Can’t Live Without

In antiques, art, behavior, culture, design, domestic life, entertainment, food, life, Style, travel on June 17, 2011 at 12:02 pm
Iridium fountain pen nib, macro.

Old school, elegant, lovely! Image via Wikipedia

One of my favorite columns is this one, in Elle Decor, called Twelve Things I Can’t Live Without.

It’s too often something of the esthete’s Olympics — Pratesi or Frette sheets (check), Cire Trudon candles (check) — with every Stylish Person selected vying for the podium position of Most Elegant Designer In The World.

Here are my twelve:

The anticipation of an imminent journey — preferably one overseas, (preferably to a country that rhymes with pants)

Earl Grey tea, loose and fresh, in a glass jar

A bone china teapot in which to brew tea and a bone china teacup from which to sip it slowly

Fresh baguettes

Pale pink silk lampshades

The weekend Financial Times

A bottle of Blenheim Bouquet cologne, (a 109-year-old scent, officially for men, but so delicious!)

A Big Turk candy bar: pink Turkish delight surrounded by dark chocolate = heaven

Candles: scented, votives, tapers…everywhere, used nightly. 

My Moroccan lantern, (which I painted a soft red), whose candle-cast shadows make my suburban New York living room feel like Fez

My passport and green card

My Lamy fountain pen and some beautiful stationery on which to write thank-you and congratulations notes


How about you?

What are some of the lovely necessities of your life?

No Shelter For Shelter Books — 'Metropolitan Home' Shut Down After 26 Years

In Media, Style on November 9, 2009 at 4:08 pm
Magazines

Image via Wikipedia

Another shelter book, and another longstanding national magazine devoted to celebrating the good life, has bit the dust. Metropolitan Home has been killed after 26 years. Parent company HFMUS plans to focus its resources on its in-house competitor, luxe, international Elle Decor instead.

I remember Met Home back when it was Apartment Life, long before Dwell, Nest, Wallpaper or Domino (now-dead) showed up. I was much sadder when House & Garden was closed and I still miss the elegant reflectiveness of Dominique Browning’s letters from the editor, but every time another shelter book dies so does a place for a different point of view and an outlet for talented writers and photographers and designers to celebrate domestic beauty, something I believe passionately in creating and sharing.

I studied interior design full-time for a while, intending to flee journalism, and came away from my studies in awe of the intelligence and drive it takes to create and promote great (even mediocre) design. I’m personally not a fan of the cavernous and relentlessly modern houses Met Home focused on, but many people are — while dozens of shelter books remain safely focused on cozy, pre-digested ideas.

It’s sadly ironic that now we’ve got designer garbage cans and toasters and lighting a mouse-click away, available from even mass marketers like Target or Pottery Barn, we’re losing places like Met Home that salute design’s cutting edge.

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