Want To Join The Board Of The Met Or MOMA? Bring $10 Million

Photograph of the facade of the Metropolitan O...
$250,000 will get you in...to their board. Image via Wikipedia

So you like art and dress well and want to meet some of Manhattan’s most wealthy and powerful?

Write a check for $10 million, or maybe just $5 million, reports The New York Times:

“For those who can, we have an expectation and we try to be very clear about that expectation,” said Reynold Levy, the president of Lincoln Center, whose board members are generally asked to contribute $250,000 upfront and on an annual basis.

Sometimes the generosity of veteran trustees will exceed expectations. Consider the $30 million gift Ann Ziff made last month to the Metropolitan Opera, which simultaneously announced that she is to become its next chairwoman.

The pressure to raise money from volunteer boards has intensified as the economy slumped and broader charitable giving declined.

Yet even with weakened portfolios, many people of means remain willing to answer the call because a spot on a cultural board is among the most coveted prizes in a city of strivers and mega-achievers. And spots are limited: the New York City Ballet, for example, has 40 voting members; the Museum of Natural History has 56.

The rewards of service are many: social status, the personal satisfaction of doing good, the chance to rub shoulders with Rockefellers and Lauders, and a say in setting the intellectual course of the nation, if not the world, through a leading museum or performing arts institution.

I sit on two boards, neither in this social or financial stratosphere — but one that does require a financial commitment from me. It’s many fewer zeroes, but it requires me to pony up to work with fellow trustees for the Writers Emergency Assistance Fund, which gives emergency grants of $5,000 for first-time recipients to writers whose work qualifies. This terrible economy, which has decimated print journalism, has hit independent writers — even those successful for decades — extremely hard.

Every single grant application I read is a reminder to be grateful as hell we have insurance, my partner still has a job and, for now, we remain in good health.

The good news? We usually get a check out within a week.

I also sit on the board of the American Society of Journalists and Authors, whose annual conference is this month in Manhattan, April 24 and 25.

Do you sit on a board? Why do you do it? What have you learned?

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