The woods, as metaphor

 

IMG_6319By Caitlin Kelly

 

In the decades of living in our suburban New York town, I’ve walked the reservoir path — a mile each way, paved — many many times, in broiling summer heat (blissfully shaded by old-growth trees) and in the dead of a snowy winter.

There’s something really special about getting to know a landscape well, to know what to look for and anticipate — from the fragrant purple lilac bush at the western end of the walk to the benches at the other end, a perfect spot to stare out across the water at sunset.

I love to watch the woods change with each season, always with my favorite smell in the world — sun-dried pine needles.

 

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I know where the creek is, and love to hear it gurgling — now disturbingly silent and completely dry after weeks without rain. The enormous pond has also shrunk, and I can now see rocks in the reservoir that reveal its drop as well.

 

 

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The pond in springtime

 

 

I love the landmarks — watermarks? — like the beaded strand of little black turtles that line up along a rubber tube on one edge of the water.

The cormorant who chooses to stand on the same rock every year to dry his wings.

The elegant swans.

The screeching red-tailed hawks.

The rustle of a chipmunk fleeing through dead leaves.

There are many trees wrapped tightly in vines — like people who so desperately cling to others.

 

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There’s a rock split in two by a tree — reminding me how much force we can bring when needed to even the toughest problem.

 

There are many live trees with dead ones propped against them, where they’ve fallen — like dear friends sustaining the ill or grieving.

 

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There’s lacy ice in winter

 

When I bend down and look closely, there are entire worlds in even just an inch or two beneath my feet: moss, acorns, lichen, stones, earth, leaves, bits of feather and foliage. Everything contains multitudes.

 

 

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Hobbit holes?!

 

 

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I value an intimate relationship with nature.

 

Do you have one like this?

4 thoughts on “The woods, as metaphor

  1. Jan Jasper

    Very lovely and evocative, both your images and your descriptions. I like your analogies to the human condition. By the way, those vines that tightly wrap around a branch or tree could be poison ivy. Be very careful.

  2. These are beautiful shots, Caitlin. What a lovely place you have to walk year round. Like you, I really enjoy walks for many reasons, and find it to be a place of respite and renewal. We are both so lucky to have places nearby that offer natural beauty to us.

    1. Thanks! I get really overheated quickly, so the fact it’s shaded and there is often a breeze really helps.

      I can’t imagine living in a place without this sort of access.

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